Ting | Listening with Your Heart | OBPP May 21, 2018

We hear with our ears, but listening is different. For example, you are listening to my words, but your ears still hear other things happening in our room or around us. As we get older, we learn what things to pay attention to and what things to tune out or keep in the background.

In China, symbols (word drawings) are used to stand for ideas. The symbol called “ting” means “to listen”

It looks like this:

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The Chinese believe that to listen, you must use your ears, eyes, and an open heart. Can you find the ear, the eyes, and the heart in this symbol?

How do we listen with our eyes?

What do we mean by listening with our heart (or an open heart)?

Careful listening shows we understand what others say or feel. We call this kind of careful listening

“listening from the heart”

 

I want you to think about what is it like to share something to the class or a friend.

Do you like them to listen attentively? Do you want them to smile back at you? Do you want them to understand why you are excited, sad, happy, or laughing? Does it feel good to have a friend to share with?

OK, now I want you to think about what it’s like to be telling a story to someone and people are talking or moving around the room when it’s your turn to speak? OR maybe even it’s just you and a friend and people are joking around and you want to be serious.

What words can you use to describe how you feel?

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Let’s watch the news videos we made on Friday and see if students were listening from the heart?

 

Here are some tips we can use to help us listen from the heart:

Watch:

Use your eyes to show you are paying attention, watch facial expressions, look at the person, don’t look around.

Lean in:

Lean your body toward the person a little and nod your head so the person knows you are listening.

Listen Quietly:

Listen to the words a person is saying, don’t interrupt, don’t talk at the same time, listen for facts about what the other person is saying.

Notice Feelings:

Listen to how someone’s voice or expressions tell you about that person’s real feelings. Notice if that matches his or her words.

Ask, Don’t Tell:

Wait until someone stops talking and ask questions to understand what the person meant, don’t give advice or tell about something that happened to you unless the person asks.

Summarize/Restate:

When the person stops talking, say what you think you heard, ask the person to explain parts you didn’t understand.

Don’t Judge:

Don’t jump to conclusions, don’t say someone is wrong, listen to his or her point of view.

Practice Silence:

Listen quietly, don’t thank about what you want to say until the person stops talking.

What did you learn about listening today?

What are examples of ways you show you listn from the heart?

How can listening form the heart help us be better friends?

How many of you think you know how to listen from the heart? LEt’s find out. HEre’s a quiz that will help you think about ow will you listen from the heart. I won’t collect these or see your answers, so answer truthfully.

 

PLEASE only fill out the one side, we will take the other quiz with a different lesson.

Listen From the HEART QUIZ

This quiz helps us think about how well we listen when other’s talk to us. Most people, even grown-ups, have to practice listening from the heart.

If you answered yes or sometimes to any of the odd numbered questions and no to the even numbered questions these are ways of listening from the heart you need to practice.

ListenFromTheHeartQuiz.JPG

Please practice listening form the heart this week with your family, your classmates and friends. Notice whether it makes a difference in how people talk with you. Listening from the heart is something you can do for the rest of your lives.

Are there any other questions or comments?

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NAPI Eagle Enforcer

So, I was thinking we should come up with a new job for the NAPI Eagle Enforcer. The position would require a deep sense of responsibility and discipline.

NAPI Eagle Song

They could be in charge of making sure that students are behaving like NAPI Eagles and if they are not then they could clip them down and bring them over the folders to sign. That would free me up to keep teaching and they could be in charge of taking care of that.

I think there are two people who would excel at this job in the beginning. One has perfect attendance which means she has displayed strong discipline the other is a grad assistant who has shown she is responsible.

The perfect attendance student could be in charge in the morning because she is always on time and the grad assistant could take over after lunch. Or something like that.

Unit Six | Past, Present, & Future | Week 5 | Finding My Place | What shapes a person’s identity?

Unit Theme: How can you build on what came before?

Have students read the Big Idea aloud. Ask students to think about ways the past can influence the future. Students may list stories, personal experiences, and other examples of how history informs the way we live.
Ask: How do we learn from the past?
Have students discuss in partners or in groups, and then share their ideas with the class.
Music Links Introduce a song at the start of the unit. Go to Resources Media: Music to find audio recordings, song lyrics, and activities.

Do people really try to chase words with a horse?

Weekly Concept: Finding My Place

Collaborative Conversations – Take On Roles

Take On Roles As students engage in discussions, encourage them to take on roles, including
  • a questioner who asks questions in order to keep everyone involved and keep the discussion moving.
  • a recorder who takes notes on the important ideas being discussed and who later reports to the class.
  • a discussion monitor who keeps the group on topic and makes sure everyone gets a turn to talk.

Essential Question: What shapes a person’s identity?

  • Tell them that individuality is a quality that makes someone different from others. It is part of a person’s identity.
    Discuss the photograph of the boys with students. Focus on how each boy’s roots may have influenced his identity.
    • Your roots include your ancestors. Knowing your roots can help you understand your identity.

     

    • Your roots also include the places where your family has lived and the cultures of those communities.

     

    Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.18.55 AM.png

    CLASS PRESENTATION ROUTINE
    Discuss “Who Am I?”
    • Select the Weekly Opener: Finding My Place.
    • Draw students’ attention to the photograph of the boy and the title “Who Am I?”
    • Ask the essential question: What shapes a person’s identify?
    • Read together with students the information on page 435 from the Reading/Writing Workshop.
    • Ask students to talk to a partner identify how family and friends can help shape who they are. Have partners discuss the concept of finding one’s place.
    • Invite students to share their ideas about the Essential Question with the class.
    CLASS PRESENTATION ROUTINE
    Build Background Video
    • Play the video about events that shape a person’s identity.
    • Discuss the video with students.
    • Have pairs discuss the following:
      How do cultural traditions help shape our identity?
      How do family and friends help shape our identity?
    • Ask partners to share with the class what they discussed.

    TALK ABOUT IT

    Ask: How would you describe your individuality? How are you like your friends and family? How are you different? What do you know about your roots? Have students discuss in pairs or groups.
    • Model using the Concept Web to generate words and phrases related to identity. Add students’ contributions.
    • Have partners continue the discussion by sharing what they believe has shaped who they are. They can complete the Concept Web, generating additional related words and phrases.
    CLASS PRESENTATION ROUTINE
    Use the Graphic Organizer
    • Select the graphic organizer.
    • Ask students to share words and phrases that tell about the weekly concept of finding one’s place.
    • Have partners turn and discuss what they have learned about how personal identity is shaped.
    • Invite students to add additional words and phrases to the organizer.
    • Save the organizer and revisit it at any point within the classroom discussion. Save the organizer to the Student Notebooks so it can be part of the information that students collect throughout this week.

Listening Comp – Papa’s Pastry Shop and One Day

Family and tradition help shape a person’s identity. Let students know that you will be reading aloud two poems. One tells about a family’s bakery, and the other tells about a special tradition a boy has with his father.

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The read aloud is Genre: Poetry

Free verse poetry.
  • Free verse poetry does not have a rhyme scheme.
  • Free verse poetry does not have a metrical pattern.
  • Free verse poetry may have irregular lines.

Vocabulary

1. Show what it means to gobble something.
2. What is a positive way to show your individuality?
3. Why is it sometimes hard to see through mist?
4. Describe something about your roots that you are proud of.
Define: Individuality is a quality that makes one person or thing different from others.
Example: Sara expressed her individuality by wearing a unique pair of slippers.
Ask: How are the words originality and individuality similar?
gobble To gobble means to eat quickly and in large chunks.
mist Mist is a cloud of tiny drops of water or other liquid in the air.
roots A person’s roots include his or her ancestors.
Poetry Terms
Introduce each poetry term. Present the definitions below. Explain that students will find examples of these elements in this week’s poems.
metaphor metaphor, such as “the lake is a mirror,” compares two unlike things without using like or as.
imagery Imagery is the use of words to create a picture in the reader’s mind.
personification Personification is when human characteristics are given to anything that is not human.
free verse Free verse poems have irregular lines and lack a metrical pattern and rhyme scheme.

Vocabulary Strategy:Words in Context

Explain to students that proverbs and adages are common sayings or expressions that get passed on over time.
  • In expository text, proverbs and adages are sometimes used to help illustrate a point about the topic.
  • Proverbs and adages usually explain a general truth or observation.
  • Students should use paragraph clues to find the meaning of an unfamiliar proverb or adage.

Learning Goals/Objectives

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

  • Determine the theme of a poem.
  • Find evidence in the text.

 

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

  • Identify imagery in poetry.
  • Identify personification in poetry.

Genre: Poetry

Share with students the following key characteristics of free verse poetry.
  • Free verse poetry does not have a rhyme scheme.
  • Free verse poetry does not have a metrical pattern.
  • Free verse poetry may have irregular lines.
  • Model identifying features of free verse poetry in “My Name Is Ivy” on page 440. Point out that the lines in“My Name Is Ivy” do not rhyme. Focus on how the last word in each line does not rhyme with the last word in any other line. Ask: Why do you think the poet chose not to have a rhyme scheme in this poem?
    CLASS PRESENTATION ROUTINE
    Genre: Poetry: Free Verse
    • Select the genre mini-lesson.
    • Use “My Name Is Ivy” to model how to identify the characteristics of a free verse poem. Click through the mini-lesson or use the tools to model identifying the elements of a free verse poem.
    • After modeling go to the Your Turn section of the mini-lesson.
    • Ask partners to reread the poem “Collage” to explain why it is a free verse poem. Have them record their responses at their desks.
    • Then call volunteers to the whiteboard to identify and discuss the elements they found.
    • Have students compare what they wrote to the volunteer’s response.
    • Or you can choose to assign the Your Turn for independent practice or a computer center activity with a partner.
    Your Turn: Answer Students can circle “Grandma gave me her eyes. “Eyes of a panther,” Grandpa whispers.”
    This shows that “Collage” has no rhyming pattern.
    Students can circle “Dad gave me his long skinny toes. “My roots reach back to the lemurs,” he jokes”
    This shows that “Collage” has no metrical pattern

 

Reading Writing Workshop – Text Fluency

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The History of Money

Connect to Concept: Money Matters Explain to students that they will read about how money has changed throughout the history of the world.
Note Taking Read page 425 to model how to take notes. I will think about the Essential Question as I read and note key ideas and details about the text. Encourage students to note questions they have, unfamiliar words, and key ideas and details.
Read Paragraph 1: Tell students you are going to take a closer look at the introduction to “The History of Money.” Reread the first paragraph together. Ask: Why is money valuable? Model how to cite text evidence.
Money is valuable because it is hard to get.
Paragraph 2: Reread the second paragraph. Remind students that summarizing can help them make sure they understand the main points. Model how to summarize.
Bartering is a way of paying for things you need. Instead of using money to pay for things, people traded goods, such as goat milk for rope.
MAKE CONNECTIONS

             

Essential Question Encourage students to work with a partner to discuss the role of money over time. Use these sentence frames to focus discussion:
  • I read that people once . . .
  • Later, currency . . .

 

Reading Comprehension:

Explain to students that imagery is the use of specific language, such as sensory words and descriptive details, to create a picture in a reader’s mind.
Explain that personification is giving human qualities to a nonhuman thing such as an animal, object, or idea.
  • An animal character that is personified talks, thinks, feels, behaves, and interacts with other characters in the same way a person would.
  • Many poets use personification to create imagery.

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Comprehension Skill:

Theme of a poem is the main message or lesson a poet wants to communicate to the reader.
  • To identify the theme, students must pay attention to the narrator’s or characters’ words and actions.
  • Then they must think about what happens as a result of these actions.
  • Students should ask themselves, “What message does the poet want to get across to the reader?”
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Literature Anthology

 

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PLAY I’m in Charge of Adverbs video on Connect Ed

 

Grammar: Using Prepositions: Introduce Sentences Using Prepositions

    • Two or more simple sentences that contain prepositional phrases can sometimes be combined into one sentence.
    • Prepositional phrases can convey location (in the corner), time (at noon), and direction (to the right). They provide more details in a sentence.
      We went to the store in the next town.
  • Have partners discuss prepositional phrases using page 471 of the Grammar Handbook in Reading/Writing Workshop.

Small Groups – Tuesday

I DO
Use Word Cards 241–247. Display one word at a time, following the routine:
Display the word. Read the word. Then spell the word.
WE DO
Ask students to state the word and spell the word with you. Model using the word in a sentence and have students repeat after you.
YOU DO
Display the word. Ask students to say the word, and then spell it. When completed, quickly flip through the word card set as students choral read the words. Provide opportunities for students to use the words in speaking and writing. For example, provide sentence starters, such as Sue said she would write____. Ask students to write each word in their Writer’s Notebook.

Spelling

Display the spelling words. Read them aloud, pointing out the prefixes and suffixes in each word.
Point out the affixes in restate and kindness. Draw a line between the roots and affixes: re/statekind/ness. Say each word. Remind students that prefixes only appear at the beginning of a word and suffixes only appear at the end.
Demonstrate sorting the spelling words by whether the word has a prefix or suffix. (Write the words on index cards or the IWB.) Sort a few words. Point out that identifying prefixes, suffixes, and roots can help students sound out words and spell them correctly.
Then use the Dictation Sentences from Day 5 to give the Pretest. Say the underlined word, read the sentence, and repeat the word. Have students write the words. Then have students check and correct their spelling.
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Analyze the Student Model

 THE READING/WRITING WORKSHOP TEXT
Analyze the Prompt  Read aloud the first paragraph on page 418 of the Reading/ Writing Workshop. Ask: What is the prompt asking? (For my opinion about the topic of the debate.) Say: Let’s reread to look for evidence for the author’s argument. We can note text evidence.
Analyze Text Evidence  Display Graphic Organizer 55 in Writer’s Workspace. Say: Let’s see how one student, Kisha, took notes to answer the prompt. Kisha noted the author’s position. Then she noted fossil fuels are used faster than they are made. Guide the class through the rest of Kisha’s notes.
Analyze the Student Model Explain how Kisha used text evidence from her notes to write a response to the prompt.
  • Topic Sentence  In an opinion, the topic sentence should clearly state the writer’s position. Kisha noted the author’s opinion. In her own writing, Kisha clearly states that she agrees with the author. Trait: Ideas
  • Supporting Details  A good writer uses strong evidence to support their argument. Kisha noted facts about the importance of energy while she read. Kisha uses her text evidence to boost her writing. Trait: Ideas
  • Transitions  Good transitions organize the argument. In her writing, Kisha uses the phrase “in addition” to show multiple reasons for her position. Trait: Word Choice
For additional practice with strong words, assign Your Turn Practice Book page 279.
Your Turn Writing  Read the Your Turn prompt on page 419 of the Reading/Writing Workshop aloud. Discuss the prompt with students. If necessary, review with students how to write an opinion statement.
Have students take notes as they find text evidence to answer the prompt. Then Remind them to include the following elements as they craft their response from their notes:
  • Topic Sentence
  • Supporting Details
  • Transitions
Have students use Grammar Handbook page 470 in the Reading/Writing Workshop to edit for errors in negatives.

CHECK OUT VIDEOS ON DAY 2

Writing:

Read Like a Writer
Remind students that everyone has opinions about issues that are important to them. When you write about an issue, you share your opinion, and you may try to persuade others to agree with you. You may also ask readers to take action on the issue. Read and discuss the features of an opinion essay.
Provide copies of the Expert Model “Nuclear Power and Our Future” and the features of an Opinion Essay found online in Writer’s Workspace.
Features of an Opinion Essay
  • It clearly states the writer’s opinion about a topic.
  • It gives clear reasons for the opinion.
  • It supports those reasons with facts and details.
  • It uses linking words and phrases to connect ideas.
  • It provides a conclusion that asks readers to take action.

STANDARDS

      • RF.4.3a  Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.  [11 lessons]
      • RF.4.4a  Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.  [2 lessons]

      • RF.4.4b  Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.  [4 lessons]

      • RI.4.7  Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.  [1 lesson]

      • RL.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [5 lessons]

      •  

        RL.4.2  Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.  [20 lessons]

      • RL.4.5  Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.  [15 lessons]

       

      • RL.4.9  Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.  [5 lessons]

Unit Six | Past, Present, & Future | Week 4 | Money Matters | What has been the role of money over time?

Collaborative Conversations – Think • Write • Pair • Share

Take Turns Talking As students engage in partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions, encourage them to follow discussion rules by taking turns speaking. Remind students to
  • wait for a person to finish before they speak. They should not speak over others.
  • quietly raise their hand to let others know they would like a turn to speak.
  • ask others in the group to share their opinions so that all students have a chance to share.

Unit Theme: How can you build on what came before?

Have students read the Big Idea aloud. Ask students to think about ways the past can influence the future. Students may list stories, personal experiences, and other examples of how history informs the way we live.
Ask: How do we learn from the past?
Have students discuss in partners or in groups, and then share their ideas with the class.
Music Links Introduce a song at the start of the unit. Go to Resources Media: Music to find audio recordings, song lyrics, and activities.

Do people really try to chase words with a horse?

Weekly Concept: Money Matters

Essential Question: What has been the role of money over time?

  • Look at the photograph of the skyscraper and fountain with students. Focus on how people inside the buildings consume energy and how they create it.

    • Electricity is usually created by machines called generators that spin metal wires between the poles of a magnet.
    • Generators spin wires in different ways. Some turn wheels using renewable resources, or resources that can be used again, such as running water and wind. Others burn nonrenewable resources, such as coal and oil.

    Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.18.05 AM.png

    If you could be an entrepreneur, what kind of business would you start? What kind of merchandise would you sell? Have students discuss in pairs or groups.
    • Model using the Concept Web to generate words and phrases that describe the way money is used. Add students’ contributions.
    • Have students continue the discussion by talking to a partner about money.

     

    CLASS PRESENTATION ROUTINE

    Use the Graphic Organizer

    • Select the graphic organizer.
    • Ask students to share words and phrases that tell about how money is used.
    • Have partners turn and discuss what they have learned how money matters.
    • Invite students to add additional words and phrases to the organizer.
    • Save the organizer and revisit it at any point within the classroom discussion. Save the organizer to the Student Notebooks so it can be part of the information that students collect throughout this week.

Listening Comp – All About Money

  • The read aloud is Genre:expository text.

    • usually begins with an introduction that explains the main idea or gives background information about the topic
    • may include headings and subheadings to help readers locate information
    • includes carefully researched facts

Vocabulary

Define: Currency is the money used in a country.
Example: I exchanged American money for foreign currency at the bank.
Ask: What kind of currency do we use in the United States?
economics Economics is the science that studies the way people use resources to produce goods and services.
Cognate: economía
entrepreneur An entrepreneur is a person who starts and runs a business.
global Something that is global has to do with the world.
Cognate: global
invest To invest is to use money to buy something that will make more money.
marketplace marketplace is a place where food and other products are bought and sold.
merchandise Merchandise is the goods that are for sale.
transaction transaction is the act of carrying out a business exchange.
Cognate: transacción
1. What currency do we use in the United States?
2. If you study economics, what do you study?
3. Explain what an entrepreneur does.
4. Describe a global problem you have read about.
5. What can people invest their money in?
6. Describe items that might be sold in a marketplace.
7. What merchandise could you buy at the mall?
8. Tell about a transaction you have made.

Vocabulary Strategy: Proverbs and Adages

Explain to students that proverbs and adages are common sayings or expressions that get passed on over time.
  • In expository text, proverbs and adages are sometimes used to help illustrate a point about the topic.
  • Proverbs and adages usually explain a general truth or observation.
  • Students should use paragraph clues to find the meaning of an unfamiliar proverb or adage.

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Learning Goals/Objectives

  1. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
  2. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.
  3. Build background knowledge on resources.
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Genre: Expository Text

    • Expository text gives facts and information about a topic. The author has been careful to verify the facts.
    • Expository text may include text features such as headings, glossaries, images and captions, diagrams, maps, and time lines, though an expository text does not always contain these features.

 

Reading Writing Workshop – Text Fluency

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The History of Money

Connect to Concept: Money Matters Explain to students that they will read about how money has changed throughout the history of the world.
Note Taking Read page 425 to model how to take notes. I will think about the Essential Question as I read and note key ideas and details about the text. Encourage students to note questions they have, unfamiliar words, and key ideas and details.
Read Paragraph 1: Tell students you are going to take a closer look at the introduction to “The History of Money.” Reread the first paragraph together. Ask: Why is money valuable? Model how to cite text evidence.
Money is valuable because it is hard to get.
Paragraph 2: Reread the second paragraph. Remind students that summarizing can help them make sure they understand the main points. Model how to summarize.
Bartering is a way of paying for things you need. Instead of using money to pay for things, people traded goods, such as goat milk for rope.
MAKE CONNECTIONS

             

Essential Question Encourage students to work with a partner to discuss the role of money over time. Use these sentence frames to focus discussion:
  • I read that people once . . .
  • Later, currency . . .

 

Reading Comprehension: Ask and Answer Questions

When students read expository text, they can ask and answer questions to help them understand unfamiliar facts and information. Remind students that they can ask questions before, during, and after reading.
  • Students should ask questions about information they do not understand and then look for answers in the text. Any prior knowledge they may have about the topic will also help. Students can ask questions to help them understand difficult sections of text. They may need to reread to find the answers to their questions. Often, students will find that asking and answering questions will improve their comprehension of informational texts.
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Comprehension Skill: Main Idea and Key Details

The main idea is the most important point that an author makes about a topic.

  • To find the main idea, students must first review the key details, or the information the author presents, and decide which details are the most important.
  • Then they decide what these details have in common, or how they are connected. This will help them determine the main idea.

    Main Idea and Key Details

    • Select the comprehension skill mini-lesson.
    • Use the first paragraph on page 412 of “The Great Energy Debate” to model identifying key details to figure out the main idea of the text. Click through the mini-lesson or use the tools to model the skill.
    • After modeling go to the Your Turn section of the mini-lesson.
    • Ask partners to reread the first paragraph on page 413 to find key details that relate to the main idea. Have them record the key details and main idea at their desks.
    • Then call a volunteer to the whiteboard to demonstrate how to use the skill.
    • Have students compare what they wrote to the volunteer’s response.
    • Or you can choose to assign the Your Turn for independent practice or a computer center activity with a partner.
    Your Turn: Answer Problem: One of the oxygen tanks exploded. The crew did not have enough oxygen to make it to the Moon.
    Steps to the solution:
    • Lovell communicated with NASA.
    • The team on the ground came up with a solution.
    • Lovell and the astronauts built an invention to clean the air in the spacecraft.
    Solution: The invention worked. It cleaned the air in the spacecraft.
    3 GUIDED PRACTICE

Literature Anthology

 

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OF FIRE and WATER

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PLAY I’m in Charge of Adverbs video on Connect Ed

 

Grammar: Negatives

  • negative is a statement that means “no,” or the opposite of its regular meaning. Most statements can be changed to a negative form.
    I want to go home.
    do not want to go home.
  • If a sentence has a form of be or have as a main or helping verb, just add not to make it negative.
    That one is my favorite.
    That one is not my favorite

Negatives

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Analyze the Student Model

 THE READING/WRITING WORKSHOP TEXT
Analyze the Prompt  Read aloud the first paragraph on page 418 of the Reading/ Writing Workshop. Ask: What is the prompt asking? (For my opinion about the topic of the debate.) Say: Let’s reread to look for evidence for the author’s argument. We can note text evidence.
Analyze Text Evidence  Display Graphic Organizer 55 in Writer’s Workspace. Say: Let’s see how one student, Kisha, took notes to answer the prompt. Kisha noted the author’s position. Then she noted fossil fuels are used faster than they are made. Guide the class through the rest of Kisha’s notes.
Analyze the Student Model Explain how Kisha used text evidence from her notes to write a response to the prompt.
  • Topic Sentence  In an opinion, the topic sentence should clearly state the writer’s position. Kisha noted the author’s opinion. In her own writing, Kisha clearly states that she agrees with the author. Trait: Ideas
  • Supporting Details  A good writer uses strong evidence to support their argument. Kisha noted facts about the importance of energy while she read. Kisha uses her text evidence to boost her writing. Trait: Ideas
  • Transitions  Good transitions organize the argument. In her writing, Kisha uses the phrase “in addition” to show multiple reasons for her position. Trait: Word Choice
For additional practice with strong words, assign Your Turn Practice Book page 279.
Your Turn Writing  Read the Your Turn prompt on page 419 of the Reading/Writing Workshop aloud. Discuss the prompt with students. If necessary, review with students how to write an opinion statement.
Have students take notes as they find text evidence to answer the prompt. Then Remind them to include the following elements as they craft their response from their notes:
  • Topic Sentence
  • Supporting Details
  • Transitions
Have students use Grammar Handbook page 470 in the Reading/Writing Workshop to edit for errors in negatives.

CHECK OUT VIDEOS ON DAY 2

Writing: Research Report

Choose a President • Inventor • Or Famous Person

Once you choose your person you can not change.

Researching information helps us learn more about the world around us. When you write a report that focuses on a central topic, you are using a form of writing known as a research report. A research report has these features:

  • It provides information focused on a central topic.
  • It has an introduction that presents the main ideas.
  • It groups facts, definitions, quotations, details, and other information into supporting paragraphs.
  • It summarizes information from a variety of reliable sources.
  • It uses precise vocabulary and a formal tone.
  • It includes linking words that connect ideas.
  • It provides a conclusion that relates to the topic.

In this workshop, you will write a research report letter that helps others understand the world around you. During this writing assignment, you will complete the following steps:

  • Identify the key features of a research report.
  • Plan and organize ideas by using notes and graphic organizers.
  • Draft, revise, and edit a research report.
  • Publish and present a research report orally.
  • PresidentialReportRubric.

STANDARDS

    • RF.4.3a  Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.  [12 lessons]
    • RF.4.4a  Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.  [5 lessons]

    • RF.4.4b  Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.  [4 lessons]

    • RI.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.3  Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.7  Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.9  Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [16 lessons]
    • RL.4.2  Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.  [21 lessons]

    • RL.4.3  Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.9  Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.  [4 lessons]

    • RL.4.10  By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.  [2 lessons]

Unit Six | Past, Present, & Future | Week 3 | Resources | How have our energy resources changed over the years?

Collaborative Conversations – Think • Write • Pair • Share

Take Turns Talking As students engage in partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions, encourage them to follow discussion rules by taking turns speaking. Remind students to
  • wait for a person to finish before they speak. They should not speak over others.
  • quietly raise their hand to let others know they would like a turn to speak.
  • ask others in the group to share their opinions so that all students have a chance to share.

Unit Theme: How can you build on what came before?

Have students read the Big Idea aloud. Ask students to think about ways the past can influence the future. Students may list stories, personal experiences, and other examples of how history informs the way we live.
Ask: How do we learn from the past?
Have students discuss in partners or in groups, and then share their ideas with the class.
Music Links Introduce a song at the start of the unit. Go to Resources Media: Music to find audio recordings, song lyrics, and activities.

Do people really try to chase words with a horse?

Weekly Concept:Resources

Essential Question: How have our energy resources changed over the years?

  • Look at the photograph of the skyscraper and fountain with students. Focus on how people inside the buildings consume energy and how they create it.

    • Electricity is usually created by machines called generators that spin metal wires between the poles of a magnet.
    • Generators spin wires in different ways. Some turn wheels using renewable resources, or resources that can be used again, such as running water and wind. Others burn nonrenewable resources, such as coal and oil.
    • Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.13 AM.png

    .

    Ask: What are are some ways you can help conserve, or use less, energy? Have students discuss in pairs or groups.
    • Model using the Concept Web to generate words and phrases related to energy and resources. Add students’ contributions.
    • Have partners continue the discussion by sharing what they have learned about energy resources. They can complete the Concept Web, generating additional related words and phrases.
    CLASS PRESENTATION ROUTINE
    Use the Graphic Organizer
    • Select the graphic organizer.
    • Ask students to share words and phrases that tell about the weekly concept of energy resources.
    • Have partners turn and discuss what they have learned about energy resources.
    • Invite students to add additional words and phrases to the organizer.
    • Save the organizer and revisit it at any point within the classroom discussion. Save the organizer to the Student Notebooks so it can be part of the information that students collect throughout this week.

Listening Comp – Light Through the Ages

  • The read aloud is Genre: narrative nonfiction.

  • Deatures of narrative nonfiction:

      • tells a story
      • presents facts and information about a topic
      • may include text features

Vocabulary

Define: Something that is renewable is able to be replaced or restored.
Example: When my library card expired, the librarian told me it was renewable.
Ask: What is something that is not renewable?
  • coincidence
coincidence is a remarkable occurrence of events or circumstances at the same time, apparently by chance.
  • consequences
Consequences are the results of an action.
  • consume
When you consume something, you use it or destroy it.
Cognate: consumir
  • converted
When something is converted , it is changed in its character, condition, or use.
  • efficient
When things are efficient , they get the wanted results with a minimum of time or effort.
  • incredible
Something that is incredible is hard or impossible to believe.
Cognate: increíble
  • installed
When something is installed , it is put in place for use or service.
1. Tell about a coincidence that made you laugh.
2. What are some consequences of not getting enough sleep?
3. How can you consume less energy?
4. Tell how a fuel is converted into energy.
5. What things do you own that are energy efficient?
6. Describe an incredible day or experience you’ve had.
7. Explain what happens when something is installed.
8. Explain why solar power is a renewable energy source.

Vocabulary Strategy:Latin and Greek Prefixes

Knowing the meanings of common Latin and Greek prefixes can help them figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words that contain those prefixes. Remind students that a prefix is a word part added to the beginning of a base word that changes the word’s meaning.
  • Two common Latin prefixes are non-, meaning “not,” and pre-, meaning “before.” Example words are nonfiction, which means “not fiction,” and prehistory, which means “before history.”
  • Two common Greek prefixes are hyper-, meaning “excessive,” and micro-, meaning “small.” Example words are hypersensitive, which means “excessively sensitive,” and microscope, a tool that helps you see very small things.
  • As students read, they should look for Latin and Greek prefixes in unfamiliar words. The prefixes provide clues to the meanings of the words.

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.48 AM.png

Learning Goals/Objectives

  1. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
  2. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.
  3. Build background knowledge on resources.
Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.51 AM.png

Genre: Narrative Nonfiction

  • When you read narrative nonfiction, they may come across unfamiliar concepts and explanations. Remind students that they can ask questions about difficult sections of text and then look for answers to understand new information.
    • Good readers ask questions about something they do not understand and then look for answers.
    • When students encounter a difficult section of text, they can ask a question that would help them understand it. They may need to reread to find an answer to the question.
    • Often, students will find that asking and answering questions will improve their comprehension of informational texts.

 

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.25 AM.png

Reading Writing Workshop – Text Fluency

The Great Energy Debate

Connect to Concept: Resources Explain to students that they will read about a classroom debate over energy resources.
Note Taking Read page 411. Model how to take notes. I will think about the Essential Question as I read and note key ideas and details. Encourage students to note any unfamiliar words.
Paragraph 2: Read the second paragraph together. Ask: What is the main idea of this paragraph? What details support the main idea?
This paragraph is about the energy debate—when it will happen, what it will be about, and what the students are responsible for. These facts are all key details that support the main idea.
Paragraphs 3–4: Read the third and fourth paragraphs. Ask: What questions do you have? How could you answer them?
Reading the third paragraph, I wonder why anyone would use fossil fuels when they have so many drawbacks. As I read, I see that the narrator gives a reason in the next paragraph. If I have question, I should look for facts that can answer them.
Essential Question Encourage students to discuss with a partner how our dependence on fossil fuels might change. Ask them to cite text evidence. Use this sentence frame to focus discussion:
  • I read that fossil fuels . . .

 

Reading Comprehension:Ask and Answer Questions

When you read narrative nonfiction, you may come across unfamiliar concepts and explanations. Remind students that you can ask questions about difficult sections of text and then look for answers to understand new information.
  • Good readers ask questions about something they do not understand and then look for answers.
  • When students encounter a difficult section of text, they can ask a question that would help them understand it. They may need to reread to find an answer to the question.
  • Often, students will find that asking and answering questions will improve their comprehension of informational texts.
Point out that the process of asking questions and looking for answers will help students focus on important information and details.
Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.40 AM.png

Comprehension Skill: Main Idea and Key Details

The main idea is the most important point that an author makes about a topic.

  • To find the main idea, students must first review the key details, or the information the author presents, and decide which details are the most important.
  • Then they decide what these details have in common, or how they are connected. This will help them determine the main idea.

    Main Idea and Key Details

    • Select the comprehension skill mini-lesson.
    • Use the first paragraph on page 412 of “The Great Energy Debate” to model identifying key details to figure out the main idea of the text. Click through the mini-lesson or use the tools to model the skill.
    • After modeling go to the Your Turn section of the mini-lesson.
    • Ask partners to reread the first paragraph on page 413 to find key details that relate to the main idea. Have them record the key details and main idea at their desks.
    • Then call a volunteer to the whiteboard to demonstrate how to use the skill.
    • Have students compare what they wrote to the volunteer’s response.
    • Or you can choose to assign the Your Turn for independent practice or a computer center activity with a partner.
    Your Turn: Answer Problem: One of the oxygen tanks exploded. The crew did not have enough oxygen to make it to the Moon.
    Steps to the solution:
    • Lovell communicated with NASA.
    • The team on the ground came up with a solution.
    • Lovell and the astronauts built an invention to clean the air in the spacecraft.
    Solution: The invention worked. It cleaned the air in the spacecraft.
    3 GUIDED PRACTICE

Literature Anthology

 

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.26.30 AMScreen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.28.08 AM

 

OF FIRE and WATER

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PLAY I’m in Charge of Adverbs video on Connect Ed

 

Grammar: Negatives

  • negative is a statement that means “no,” or the opposite of its regular meaning. Most statements can be changed to a negative form.
    I want to go home.
    do not want to go home.
  • If a sentence has a form of be or have as a main or helping verb, just add not to make it negative.
    That one is my favorite.
    That one is not my favorite

Negatives

 Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.57 AM.png

Analyze the Student Model

 THE READING/WRITING WORKSHOP TEXT
Analyze the Prompt  Read aloud the first paragraph on page 418 of the Reading/ Writing Workshop. Ask: What is the prompt asking? (For my opinion about the topic of the debate.) Say: Let’s reread to look for evidence for the author’s argument. We can note text evidence.
Analyze Text Evidence  Display Graphic Organizer 55 in Writer’s Workspace. Say: Let’s see how one student, Kisha, took notes to answer the prompt. Kisha noted the author’s position. Then she noted fossil fuels are used faster than they are made. Guide the class through the rest of Kisha’s notes.
Analyze the Student Model Explain how Kisha used text evidence from her notes to write a response to the prompt.
  • Topic Sentence  In an opinion, the topic sentence should clearly state the writer’s position. Kisha noted the author’s opinion. In her own writing, Kisha clearly states that she agrees with the author. Trait: Ideas
  • Supporting Details  A good writer uses strong evidence to support their argument. Kisha noted facts about the importance of energy while she read. Kisha uses her text evidence to boost her writing. Trait: Ideas
  • Transitions  Good transitions organize the argument. In her writing, Kisha uses the phrase “in addition” to show multiple reasons for her position. Trait: Word Choice
For additional practice with strong words, assign Your Turn Practice Book page 279.
Your Turn Writing  Read the Your Turn prompt on page 419 of the Reading/Writing Workshop aloud. Discuss the prompt with students. If necessary, review with students how to write an opinion statement.
Have students take notes as they find text evidence to answer the prompt. Then Remind them to include the following elements as they craft their response from their notes:
  • Topic Sentence
  • Supporting Details
  • Transitions
Have students use Grammar Handbook page 470 in the Reading/Writing Workshop to edit for errors in negatives.

CHECK OUT VIDEOS ON DAY 2

Writing: Research Report

Choose a President • Inventor • Or Famous Person

Once you choose your person you can not change.

Researching information helps us learn more about the world around us. When you write a report that focuses on a central topic, you are using a form of writing known as a research report. A research report has these features:

  • It provides information focused on a central topic.
  • It has an introduction that presents the main ideas.
  • It groups facts, definitions, quotations, details, and other information into supporting paragraphs.
  • It summarizes information from a variety of reliable sources.
  • It uses precise vocabulary and a formal tone.
  • It includes linking words that connect ideas.
  • It provides a conclusion that relates to the topic.

In this workshop, you will write a research report letter that helps others understand the world around you. During this writing assignment, you will complete the following steps:

  • Identify the key features of a research report.
  • Plan and organize ideas by using notes and graphic organizers.
  • Draft, revise, and edit a research report.
  • Publish and present a research report orally.
  • PresidentialReportRubric.

STANDARDS

    • RF.4.3a  Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.  [12 lessons]
    • RF.4.4a  Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.  [5 lessons]

    • RF.4.4b  Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.  [4 lessons]

    • RI.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.3  Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.7  Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.9  Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [16 lessons]
    • RL.4.2  Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.  [21 lessons]

    • RL.4.3  Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.9  Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.  [4 lessons]

    • RL.4.10  By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.  [2 lessons]

Presidential Research

PresidentialReportRubric.jpg

So we are working on Presidential Report (here’s the rubric) for oral reports for our April Authentic Literacy Project. Parents are invited to the final presentations!

Question 5. What obstacles did this president face while in office? has been difficult for students. Here is an example of a challenge George Washington faced:

At one time Congress could not pay the soldiers and the soldiers started to rebel. The general (Washington) spoke to them about the need to keep fighting and he said he himself would accept no pay until the war was won. The soldiers began to cry and there was no talk of mutinyafter that day. 

Here is the website I found the answer at: https://gardenofpraise.com/ibdwash.htm

Another website to check is:
http://www.usa4kids.com/presidents/John_Quiency_Adams.html
According to the site here’s an obstacle John Quincy Adams faced:

“He also proposed the development of science and art in the United States by establishing a national university, financing scientific expeditions and erecting an observatory. However, his critics quoted such steps transcended limitations in the constitution.”
That means he built the first US National University but some people thought it was a waste of money and tax payer dollars kind of like the little girls who’s grandpa wasn’t very excited to see the US land on the moon.

 

Unit Six | Past, Present, & Future | Week 2 | Notes from the Past | Why is it important to keep a record of the past?

Collaborative Conversations – Think • Write • Pair • Share

Take Turns Talking As students engage in partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions, encourage them to follow discussion rules by taking turns speaking. Remind students to
  • wait for a person to finish before they speak. They should not speak over others.
  • quietly raise their hand to let others know they would like a turn to speak.
  • ask others in the group to share their opinions so that all students have a chance to share.

Unit Theme: How can you build on what came before?

Have students read the Big Idea aloud. Ask students to think about ways the past can influence the future. Students may list stories, personal experiences, and other examples of how history informs the way we live.
Ask: How do we learn from the past?
Have students discuss in partners or in groups, and then share their ideas with the class.
Music Links Introduce a song at the start of the unit. Go to Resources Media: Music to find audio recordings, song lyrics, and activities.

Do people really try to chase words with a horse?

Weekly Concept: Notes from the Past

Essential Question:Why is it important to keep a record of the past?

  • We can learn about the way people lived long ago by looking at records of the past.
    Discuss the photograph of the immigrant family with students. Focus on the reasons keeping a record of the past is important.
    • We can look at records of the past to learn about the experiences immigrants had long ago.
    • Photographs, diaries, and letters are all records of the past.
    • Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.29 AM.png

    .

Listening Comp – Waiting for Battle Orders

It is important to keep a record of the past so that we can better understand where people come from and what they have endured. We will be reading aloud a story about a young man who writes home to his family on the eve of an important battle. As you listen,  think about how the story answers the Essential Question.
  • ListeningCompPlay

    The read aloud is Genre: historical fiction.

    • Historical fiction has realistic characters, events, and settings.
    • Historical fiction is set in the past and is based on real events.
    • Historical fiction has fictional characters that are interwoven with characters based on real people in history.
    • Historical fiction can be a series of diary entries or letters.

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.44 AM.png

Vocabulary

 

Define: Depicts means shows in pictures or words.
Example: The painting depicts an important moment in our nation’s history.
Ask: What is a synonym for depicts?
depicts Depicts means shows in pictures or words.
detested Detested means disliked or hated very much.
discarded Discarded means thrown away.
eldest The eldest is the one who was born first, or the oldest.
ignored Ignored means having not paid attention to someone or something.
obedience Obedience is the act of following instructions, or doing what someone else says to do.
refuge refuge is a shelter or protection from danger or trouble.
Cognate: refugio
treacherous Treacherous means full of danger or hazardous.

Vocabulary Strategy: Homophones

Explain to students that homophones are words that sound alike, but are spelled differently and have different meanings.
  • Homophone pairs, such as there and their, are easily confused.
  • Students can use prior knowledge of familiar homophones along with context clues to help them understand the meaning of a homophone in a text.

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.59 AM.png

Learning Goals/Objectives

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.
Reread difficult passages to increase understanding.
Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.02 AM

Genre: Historical Fiction

  • Historical fiction has realistic characters, events, and settings.
  • Historical fiction is set in the past and is based on real events that happened during a specific period in history.
  • Historical fiction can have fictional characters and characters that are based on real people.
  • Historical fiction includes literary elements, such as dialogue.

 

Reading Writing Workshop – Text Fluency

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.37 AM.png

 

Connect to Concept: Notes from the Past Explain to students that they will read about how a boy uses a diary to keep a record of the past.
Note Taking Read page 397 together. As you read, model how to take notes. I will think about the Essential Question as I read and note main events and details. Continue reading the selection with students.
Paragraph 1: Read the first paragraph together. Ask: Why is Lucius at Fort Mose? Model how to cite text evidence.
The narrator says Lucius’s family ran away from a plantation in South Carolina and now they are living at Fort Mose, which is a refuge for runaways.
Paragraph 2: Model how to paraphrase the rest of the page. Review that paraphrasing, or restating the text in your own words, helps you make sure you understand what you are reading.
Lucius is telling about his life on the plantation and how he learned to read. A farmer gave Lucius the diary so he could keep a written record of what was happening at that time.

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.54 AM

Reading Comprehension: ReREAD

When you read historical fiction, you may come across facts and information that are new to them. You can Reread challenging sections of the text to increase you understanding.
  • Good readers reread paragraphs and sections that they do not understand. They stop and think about the information. If they are still unsure about what they are reading, they reread again.
  • When students encounter unfamiliar facts and information, they can reread that section to improve their understanding.
Point out that rereading will also help them remember the most important ideas and details.
Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.52 AM.png

Comprehension Skill: Theme

The theme is the overall message or lesson about life that an author wants to communicate to the reader.
  • The theme is often implied rather than stated directly.
  • To identify the theme, students must pay attention to the characters’ words and actions and what happens to them.
  • Students should ask themselves, “What message does the author want to get across to the reader?”

Literature Anthology

 

 1  Skill: Compare and Contrast

What hardships did immigrants face in their home countries before coming to the United States? (Immigrants faced poverty, hunger,unemployment.)What did they expect from life in the United States? (They expected opportunities to work in factories and on the railroad. Many hoped to own land.)

 

Reread

Text Features: Photographs with Captions
Reread the caption and look again at the photograph on page 493. What information do you learn about immigrants from the caption on page 493 that is not in the text? Cite evidence from the caption. (The caption describes the excitement immigrants felt when they arrived in the United States.) How does the photo support the text? Cite text evidence to support your response. (The text says that immigrants moved to the United States for a better life. The photo shows men raising their hats to the Statue of Liberty. They hope for a better life.)

 

One Nation, Many Cultures

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Valley of the Moon

Screen Shot 2018-04-14 at 8.27.12 AM.png

PLAY I’m in Charge of Adverbs video on Connect Ed

 

Grammar: Adverbs

    • Adverbs can be used to compare two or more actions.
    Please listen more quietly.
    • Add -er or -est to most short adverbs to compare actions:
    Jay runs faster than I do.
    Mara runs the fastest of all.
    • Use more and most with long adverbs and a few short ones to compare actions.
    I waited more patiently today.
    I walk more often than I drive.
  • GrammarPractice
  • Phonics: Spelling: Words with /ən/

    Point out the spelling patterns in the words boulder and bolder. Contrast the spelling of boulder and bolder; explain that both words have the /ō/ sound, but one is spelled with and the other is spelled with ou.
    Demonstrate sorting the spelling words by pattern under key words root and route. (Write the words on index cards or the IWB.) Sort a few words. Note that some words have more than one homophone. (ex: there, their, they’re; to, too, two)
    root dough blew
    route oar blue
    tail ore peak
    tale heard peek
    prince herd knead
    prints who’s need
    doe whose
  • Writing: Narrative

    Write about a tradition that is important to you. Use strong words to make your description clear.

    First spend 30 seconds thinking about what you learned.

    Second share your ideas with the class.

    Now write continuously for five minutes in your Writer’s Notebook. Make sure students write as much as they can without worrying about grammar or spelling write now, just sound out as many words as they can to capture their thoughts.

    Write to Sources

    Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.17.07 AM.png

     

Analyze the Student Model

Analyze the Prompt   What is the prompt asking? (What is Will’s perspective on learning to read?) Say: Let’s reread to look for details about how Lucius learned to read. We can note text evidence.
Analyze Text Evidence  Display Graphic Organizer 53 in Writer’s Workspace. Say: Let’s see how one student, Zach, took notes to answer the prompt. Zach noted the setting of where Lucius and Will met. Then he noted how Lucius felt about learning to read. Guide the class through the rest of Zach’s notes. Guide the class through the rest of Zach’s notes.
Analyze the Student Model Explain how Zach used text evidence from his notes to write a response to the prompt.
  • Strong Opening  Writers catch the reader’s attention with an interesting first sentence. Zach opened with “a wonderful thing has happened” but didn’t say what that thing was right away. Trait: Organization
  • Sequence  A clear sequence of events keeps writing organized. The author used diary entries to create a chronological sequence. Zach used the word “first” to indicate the order in his writing. Trait: Organization
  • Descriptive Details  Zach used descriptions to make his writing more realistic. He noted Will’s feelings about learning to read. He used the phrase “tears of happiness” to show his character’s emotion. Trait: Ideas
For additional practice with strong words, assign Your Turn Practice Book page 269.
Your Turn Writing  Read the Your Turn prompt on page 405 of the Reading/Writing Workshop aloud. Discuss the prompt with students. If necessary, review point of view with students.
Have students take notes as they find text evidence to answer the prompt. Remind them to include the following elements as they craft their response from their notes:
  • Strong Opening
  • Sequence
  • Descriptive Details

CHECK OUT VIDEOS ON DAY 2

Writing: Research Report

Choose a President • Inventor • Or Famous Person

Once you choose your person you can not change.

Researching information helps us learn more about the world around us. When you write a report that focuses on a central topic, you are using a form of writing known as a research report. A research report has these features:

  • It provides information focused on a central topic.
  • It has an introduction that presents the main ideas.
  • It groups facts, definitions, quotations, details, and other information into supporting paragraphs.
  • It summarizes information from a variety of reliable sources.
  • It uses precise vocabulary and a formal tone.
  • It includes linking words that connect ideas.
  • It provides a conclusion that relates to the topic.

In this workshop, you will write a research report letter that helps others understand the world around you. During this writing assignment, you will complete the following steps:

  • Identify the key features of a research report.
  • Plan and organize ideas by using notes and graphic organizers.
  • Draft, revise, and edit a research report.
  • Publish and present a research report orally.
  • PresidentialReportRubric.

STANDARDS

    • RF.4.3a  Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.  [12 lessons]
    • RF.4.4a  Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.  [5 lessons]

    • RF.4.4b  Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.  [4 lessons]

    • RI.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.3  Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.7  Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.  [1 lesson]

    • RI.4.9  Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [16 lessons]
    • RL.4.2  Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.  [21 lessons]

    • RL.4.3  Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.4  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).  [1 lesson]

    • RL.4.9  Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.  [4 lessons]

    • RL.4.10  By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.  [2 lessons]

Math vocabulary lists

 

March 12-­16

4th Grade

  • Denominator­ – the number below the line in a common fraction showing how many parts in the whole
  • Numerator­ the number above the line in a common fraction showing how many of the parts of the whole being identified
  • Prime ­a number that is evenly divisible only by itself and one
  • Composite ­a number that is a multiple of at least two numbers other than itself and one
  • Fraction ­a number usually expressed in the form a/b
  • Perimeter ­the border or outer boundary of a two ­dimensional figure

March 19-­23

4th Grade

  • Value­ A number represented by a figure.
  • Thousands ­A cardinal number, 10 times 100.
  • Ones­ The first and lowest whole number.
  • Tens­ A cardinal number, nine plus one
  • Hundreds ­a cardinal number, ten times ten.
  • Area­ The measurement inside a perimeter; the surface measure of a 2­D shape
  • Decimal­ pertaining to the tenths, usually indicated by a dot (decimal point)

March 26­-29

  • Acute­ an angle that measures between 1 degree and 89 degrees ; measuring less than 90 degrees
  • Right angle­ an angle that measures exactly 90 degrees.
  • Obtuse­ an angle that measures between 91 degrees and 179 degrees
  • Angle­ two rays originating from a single vertex.
  • Vertex­A point in which two or more lines, segments or rays meet.
  • Array­ an order or arrangement

April 3­-6

  • Parallel­ extending in the same direction, equidistant at all points, and never meeting or crossing
  • Perpendicular­ lines that meet and/or cross each other at 90 degrees
  • Line­ a series of points continuing in the same direction and extending indefinitely
  • Segment­ a part or section of a line with definite end points
  • Intersect­ the point where lines, segments, or rays meet or cross each other
  • Point­ a specific spot as on a line that has not extension; usually a dot represented by a letter.
  • Ray­ a line that begins at a single point and extends indefinitely in one direction.

April 9-13

 

  • Polygon­ a shape with a set number of sides.
  • Hexagon­ any shape with six sides, six angles, and six vertices.
  • Quadrilateral­ any shape with four sides, four angles, and four vertices.
  • Right triangle­ an angle that measures exactly 90 degrees.
  • Pentagon­ a shape with five sides, five angles, and five vertices. Sides­ the edge of a given shape between two consecutive vertices.

Unit Six | Past, Present, & Future | Week 1 | Old and New | How can you build on what came before?

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Collaborative Conversations – Think • Write • Pair • Share

Take Turns Talking As students engage in partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions, encourage them to follow discussion rules by taking turns speaking. Remind students to
  • wait for a person to finish before they speak. They should not speak over others.
  • quietly raise their hand to let others know they would like a turn to speak.
  • ask others in the group to share their opinions so that all students have a chance to share.

Unit Theme: How can you build on what came before?

Have students read the Big Idea aloud. Ask students to think about ways the past can influence the future. Students may list stories, personal experiences, and other examples of how history informs the way we live.
Ask: How do we learn from the past?
Have students discuss in partners or in groups, and then share their ideas with the class.
Music Links Introduce a song at the start of the unit. Go to Resources Media: Music to find audio recordings, song lyrics, and activities.

Do people really try to chase words with a horse?

Weekly Concept: Old and New

A tradition is something that a group of people passes from one generation to the next to keep its culture alive.

Discuss the photograph of the dancer with students. Focus on how the tradition depicted allows him and his audience to connect with their people’s past.
  • The man in the photograph is performing a traditional dance in his culture’s traditional dress.
  • Traditions are a way for people to honor their ancestors, or remember the deeds and practices of past generations.

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Essential Question: How do traditions connect people?

  • how to take notes. I will think about the Essential Question as I read and note main events and important details.
    Paragraphs 2 and 3: Reread the second and third paragraphs of “A Surprise Reunion.” Ask: Do the events in the third paragraph take place in the past or the present? Model how to cite evidence.
    The second paragraph tells me that Chief Cameahwait is remembering games he played as a child. In the third paragraph, I read that his sister was taken from the camp long ago. This tells me that the Chief is thinking about past events.
    Reread Paragraph 13: Model how to summarize important details and connect information. Ask: How do Chief Cameahwait’s words relate to the weekly theme?
    Chief Cameahwait is grateful that he has been reunited with his sister. He wants his tribe to remember the day with stories and songs. By honoring the day, he is beginning a tradition.

    .

Listening Comp – Read the Sky

Tell students that people keep their traditions alive by teaching them to future generations. Let students know that you will be reading aloud a passage about a girl who learns about a tradition from her neighbor. As you read, have students think about what the narrator learns about cultural traditions.
Tell students that people keep their traditions alive by teaching them to future generations. Let students know that you will be reading aloud a passage about a girl who learns about a tradition from her neighbor. As you read, have students think about what the narrator learns about cultural traditions.

The read aloud is Genre: historical fiction.

  • Historical fiction has realistic characters, events, and settings.
  • Historical fiction is set in the past and is based on real events that happened during a specific period in history.
  • Historical fiction can have fictional characters and characters that are based on real people.
  • Historical fiction includes literary elements, such as dialogue.
  • Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.12 AM

 

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Vocabulary

 

Define: When something is irritating , it can make someone angry or impatient.
Example: Sofia found the loud buzzing of the alarm very irritating.
Ask: What are some things that you might describe as irritating?
  • ancestors
Ancestors are people from whom one is descended.
  • despised
Despised means looked down on as worthless, or scorned.
  • endurance
Endurance is the power to put up with hardships or difficulties.
  • forfeit
Forfeit means to lose or have to give up because of some fault, accident, or mistake.
  • honor
To honor means to show or feel great respect for a person or thing.
  • intensity
Intensity means having or showing strong feeling, purpose, or effort. Cognate: intensidad
  • retreated
Retreated means to have withdrawn or moved back.

Vocabulary Strategy: Connotation and Denotation

Words you read often have meanings effects beyond the definitions listed in dictionaries.

  • A word’s denotation is the literal definition of a word that you would find in a dictionary.
  • A word’s connotation is the feeling of a word or the effect that it has on the reader. It is related to the word’s literal meaning but often comes from the way in which the word has been used in the past.

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Learning Goal/Objective

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Reread difficult passages to increase understanding.

Genre: Historical Fiction

  • Historical fiction has realistic characters, events, and settings.
  • Historical fiction is set in the past and is based on real events that happened during a specific period in history.
  • Historical fiction can have fictional characters and characters that are based on real people.
  • Historical fiction includes literary elements, such as dialogue.

 

Reading Writing Workshop – Text Fluency

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What clues can help you understand when certain events occurred?

graphicOrganizer

Write about Chief Cameahwait

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Reading Comprehension: ReREAD

When you read historical fiction you can reread sections of the text to increase your understanding of historical events and figures that are new to you.
  • Good readers reread sentences or paragraphs that they do not understand. They stop and think about what they already know and make connections as they reread the text
  • When they encounter new or challenging information, students can reread that section. They may need to reread more than once to make sure they understand.
  • Students may find that rereading improves their comprehension.
Explain that rereading will also help them remember the most important ideas and details in a historical fiction text.
Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.02 AM

Comprehension Skill: Theme

The theme is the central message or lesson that an author wants readers to understand. The theme is often implied rather than stated directly.
  • To identify the theme, students should pay close attention to what characters say and feel and how they resolve any problems.
  • Encourage students to keep track of important ideas, messages, or lessons and explain how they are conveyed through details in the text.
  • Students will make inferences, using details in the text.

What clues can help you understand when certain events occurred?

Discuss with a Partner:

Encourage students to work with a partner to discuss how learning about Jamestown can help us understand the present. Use these sentence frames to focus the discussion:

  • I read that an electron microscope . . .
  • This allows scientists to . . 

Literature Anthology

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.25.37 AM

Help students understand that this story takes place in 1850. During that time, Native American groups were being forced off their lands as settlers spread west. This caused great hardship for Native American groups, or tribes, such as the Ojibwe.
On a map, point out the region of the United States where the story takes place, east of the Mississippi River, near Lake Superior.
  • In what year does the story take place? (1850)
  • Who is Omakayas? (a nine-year-old Ojibwe girl)
  • What has happened to “the raggedy ones”? (They have been forced off their land.)

 

          Chorally read the title. Act out the meaning of silence. Tell students that silence is the opposite of noise. Point out the cognate silencio. Ask: Have you ever played a game of silence?
  • Why do you think the children play a game of silence? (Possible answer: They have to keep quiet, and the game is a fun way to keep quiet.)

Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.25.59 AM

PLAY I’m in Charge of Adverbs video on Connect Ed

 

Grammar: Adverbs

An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb.
We left quickly.

  • Adverbs tell when, where, or how an action takes place.
    rarely go to the movies.
  • Adverbs can be written before or after the verbs they describe.
    accidentally dropped the ball.
    I dropped the ball accidentally.
  • Many adverbs end in -ly. These usually tell how.
    We easily caught the butterflies
  • Grammar: Adverbs
  • Phonics: Spelling: Words with /ən/

    Point out the spelling patterns in widen and wagon. Segment the words sound by sound, attaching a spelling to each sound. Point out that each word has a different spelling for /ən/: one uses -en and the other uses -on.
    Demonstrate sorting the spelling words by pattern under key words wovenrobin, and reason. (Write the words on index cards or the IWB.) Sort a few words. Point out that the /ən/ sound has four possible spellings: -in, -on, -an, and -en.
    Then use the Dictation Sentences from Day 5 to give the Pretest. Say the underlined word, read the sentence, and repeat the word. Have students write the words. Then have students check and correct their spelling.
    woman open dragon
    shaken robin person
    garden cousin common
    eleven muffin season
    ripen button wagon
    kitten reason lemon
    widen cotton
  • Writing: Narrative

    Write about a tradition that is important to you. Use strong words to make your description clear.

    First spend 30 seconds thinking about what you learned.

    Second share your ideas with the class.

    Now write continuously for five minutes in your Writer’s Notebook. Make sure students write as much as they can without worrying about grammar or spelling write now, just sound out as many words as they can to capture their thoughts.

    Write to Sources

    Screen Shot 2018-04-08 at 8.16.22 AM.png

     

Analyze the Student Model

Byron used text evidence from his notes to write a response to the prompt.
  • Topic Sentence A good topic sentence introduces the subject. Byron began his writing by introducing his topic and clearly stating his position. Trait: Ideas
  • Supporting Details Byron’s supporting details should give evidence for why John Smith was important to Jamestown. Byron noted two ways that Smith was important. Trait: Ideas
  • Strong Conclusion A strong conclusion summarizes the main idea. Byron explains why the details he gave are the reasons that Jamestown was able to endure. Ask students how Byron used his notes to write his conclusion. Trait: Organization

CHECK OUT VIDEOS ON DAY 2

Writing: Research Report

Choose a President • Inventor • Or Famous Person

Once you choose your person you can not change.

Researching information helps us learn more about the world around us. When you write a report that focuses on a central topic, you are using a form of writing known as a research report. A research report has these features:

  • It provides information focused on a central topic.
  • It has an introduction that presents the main ideas.
  • It groups facts, definitions, quotations, details, and other information into supporting paragraphs.
  • It summarizes information from a variety of reliable sources.
  • It uses precise vocabulary and a formal tone.
  • It includes linking words that connect ideas.
  • It provides a conclusion that relates to the topic.

In this workshop, you will write a research report letter that helps others understand the world around you. During this writing assignment, you will complete the following steps:

  • Identify the key features of a research report.
  • Plan and organize ideas by using notes and graphic organizers.
  • Draft, revise, and edit a research report.
  • Publish and present a research report orally.
  • PresidentialReportRubric.

STANDARDS

  • RF.4.3a  Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context.  [13 lessons]
  • RF.4.4a  Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.  [5 lessons]
  • RF.4.4b  Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.  [4 lessons]
  • RF.4.4c  Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.  [1 lesson]
  • RI.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [2 lessons]
  • RI.4.2  Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.  [10 lessons]
  • RI.4.3  Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.  [13 lessons]
  • RI.4.4  Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.  [2 lessons]
  • RI.4.5  Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.  [1 lesson]
  • RI.4.7  Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.  [3 lessons]
  • RI.4.9  Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.  [1 lesson]
  • RL.4.1  Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.  [17 lessons]
  • RL.4.2  Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.  [21 lessons]
  • RL.4.3  Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). [1 lesson]
  • RL.4.9  Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.  [1 lesson]
  • RL.4.10  By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.  [1 lesson]

NAPI Code Award

Why we want to win the NAPI Code Award for 4th quarter.

NapiEaglesSong

The students who win the NAPI Code Award are showing the most NAPI pride throughout the school.

NAPI Code

  • Napi Eagles Are Safe
  • Always Respectful
  • Participate in their Education
  • Inspire and Include Others

They walk quietly and politely in line. They quickly get where they are going and they enjoy more visiting time because they have arrived ahead of time. They are PAX leaders who better their school the entire 7 hours they are in the NAPI building. They are the most trustworthy and responsible students in the school. They consistently help their classmates, they inspire and include others, they do their best work.

They follow directions the first time. They complete their work with care and finish their assignments quickly. They follow school rules and don’t bring slime or other distracting toys, chew gum, eat in the classroom or drink gatorade.

Because they do all these things they are very respected, get better grades, earn more recess time and enjoy activities like brain breaks and free time. Their brains are full of interesting facts and they are able to communicate their ideas in multiple ways including using video, photographs, artwork etc.

Best of all we will feel really really proud of ourselves for doing it. We can really celebrate and have the most fun the last week of school during field week etc!

The other day I saw two boys who were guests in our room look at the FOCUS WALL Helper doing their job with complete respect and admiration. They were like that’s cool! We can create a total online presence and rock NAPI! We can say check this out what we’re learning. I can’t believe no one has made me a page about the Glacier Park trip.

Show them how to use the Chrome books. Get 80% and better on the Wonders assessments write quality essays and you can show the rest of the kids how to use a Chromebook for learning. The other teachers are excited to learn about khan academy and IXL.